WATCH: God Saves a Marriage from Addiction

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Everyone knows that alcohol addiction can destroy a marriage. In fact, my own father could never break free from the battle with the bottle.

But it doesn’t have to be so.

Today, I want to share with you a story about an Indiana couple who reached out to us for help. Their story might be yours or someone you love and care about. If so, please share it with them.

Focus on the Family’s National Institute of Marriage can help couples get back on the path towards a healthy, stable relationship.

Understanding Your Spouse’s Personality

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It’s really true: opposites do attract.

If you’re married, then you’ve likely experienced it in countless ways. Your spouse sees the world through entirely different eyes. You fall asleep to noise, but your spouse needs quiet. You’re a night owl, but your spouse enjoys mornings. For the most part, with a little communication, these differences can be navigated.

But sometimes it’s differences in communication itself that are the problem.

That dilemma is captured imaginatively in the title of a book written by today’s guests, Bill and Pam Farrel: “Men Are Like Waffles, Women Are Like Spaghetti.”

It’s a simple word picture to illustrate the inherent differences between men and women.

How God Healed a “Messy” Marriage

Domingo and Irene Garcia

We’re inspired by love stories because of their happy endings. But, more often than not, before the “happily ever after,” fairy tale couples usually have to travel a lot of hard road.

That was certainly the case with Irene and Domingo Garcia. In fact, the beginning of their story was characterized by so much brokenness and conflict it was unlikely they could have ever had a happy ending.

Irene was 13 when she first met Domingo, a 16-year-old, street-wise tough guy who was already an alcoholic.

Four Ways Failing Marriages and Healthy Marriages Look the Same

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If a couple in your church was headed for divorce, would anyone be able to see it coming before it was too late?

Chances are less likely than you might think, according to a new study that Focus on the Family sponsored through LifeWay Research. The study found that in the three months leading up to divorce, churchgoing couples in troubled marriages show similar levels of involvement as those in healthy marriages in four areas:

Attend church once a week or more
Involvement in a small group
Serve in community ministries
Hold positions of responsibility at church

What’s even more astounding is that nearly one-third of churchgoers who divorced never told anyone in their congregation that they were experiencing marital problems.

One Woman’s Story of Domestic Violence

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Every now and then our radio broadcast covers a topic that breaks my heart.

This is one of them.

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month here in the U.S., so we’re gearing today’s and tomorrow’s programs toward creating awareness about domestic violence and offering information and hope to those who may be suffering abuse themselves.

Some of our listeners might be thinking, “Why would Focus be talking about a subject like this on Christian radio?” Well, the sad truth is, domestic violence happens within the Christian community as well, so we need to talk about it openly and honestly.

Did You Know This About the Christian Singer Plumb?

Christian Music Artist, Plumb


Have you ever had a shirt with a loose thread? It seems like such a small thing, doesn’t it? But all it takes is one quick tug for you to realize that thread is part of a much larger problem. The next thing you know, your clothing is unraveling right before your eyes.

A marriage can have loose threads, too. A husband and wife don’t see eye-to-eye, or they’re not communicating very well, or little resentments start to crop up here and there.

How to Resolve Football Season Woes in Marriage

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Do you like football?

Not everybody does, of course, a reality that can lead to frustrations in marriage.

My wife, Jean, isn’t a raving fan of the game, but she appreciates the enjoyment the boys and I get from both playing and watching it. That said, we’re not overly “plugged in” to a regimen of watching on television. Because we don’t watch regular TV at all, catching a Sunday afternoon game is a treat.

But what about the husband or wife (women make up 45 percent of the NFL fan base) for whom football is a major passion?

How to Speak Your Husband’s Language

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Note: If you’re looking for a powerful and uplifting faith-filled movie this weekend, I’d encourage you to consider “WAR ROOM“– a new film from the creators of “Fireproof” and “Courageous.” My colleague, Adam Holz, writes that War Room shows “…what it really looks like to create space for prayer in our lives amid the real struggles that inevitably conspire to crowd it out.” To read his full review, please visit our Plugged In website.

Why Ashley Madison Subscribers Are Chasing a Lie

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Owners of Ashley Madison, the infamous adultery-facilitating website, bill themselves as being a source of “online personals & [a] dating destination for casual encounters.”

They’re also a site and source of misery and lies. And now, thanks to hackers, millions of their users have had their private sins made public.

During my career as a minister and clinical psychologist, I’ve worked with hundreds of couples grappling with the excruciating pain and heartbreak of infidelity. The reality is there’s nothing new about sexual sin.

We Don’t Need Nice Men

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“We make men without chests and expect from them virtue and enterprise” – C.S. Lewis.

It’s a popular trend these days to raise boys into “nice guys.” Men are expected to be sweet and gentle – almost feminine – in the way they interact with the people around them. But I think that mentality is putting our families at risk. We don’t need more “nice” guys. We need strong men.

First of all, let me clarify.